A crowd jers, taunts and physically attack Tougaloo students participating in a sit-in at the Woolworth's lunch counter in Jackson, Mississippi, May 28, 1963

Above: A crowd jers, taunts and physically attack Tougaloo students participating in a sit-in at the Woolworth's lunch counter in Jackson, Mississippi, May 28, 1963.

Share This Story

Bookmark and ShareBookmark This
EmailEmail Story

Follow CLAS

Subscribe to the CLAS RSS Feed RSS Feed
Become a Fan of the CLAS Facebook Page FACEBOOK
Follow us on Twitter TWITTER

50th Anniversary of Civil Rights
Sit-ins to be Discussed at UF

The upcoming 50th anniversary of the sit-ins that energized the civil rights movement in the South will be discussed on December 8 at the University of Florida.

The Bob Graham Center for Public Service will present “The 50th Anniversary of the Sit-Ins: From Greensboro to Tallahassee” at 7 p.m. in the Pugh Hall Ocora.

Panelists for this program will include history professors Bill Link and Alan Petigny and religion professor Gwendolyn Simmons who will discuss the significance of the sit-in movement and its impact on the nation. David Colburn, history professor emeritus, will moderate the discussion. Time will be provided for questions and discussion. The program is free and open to the public. Tickets are not required.

Fifty years ago segregation permeated life in the South and in Florida. On Feb.1, 1960, the foundation of segregation was shattered when four college students from North Carolina A&T University sat at the whites-only counter at the F.W. Woolworth Store in Greensboro. The students returned on subsequent days and were joined by other students who shared their belief that it was time for change. In the following days and weeks, the sit-in movement spread throughout the South and stirred the nation, ultimately leading to the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

“The sit-in movement was one of the most important social movements in American history,” said Colburn, director of the Askew Institute and provost emeritus. “The actions of these college students made possible the overthrow of segregation and the nation’s acceptance of equality and freedom.”

The Graham Center provides students with opportunities to train for future leadership positions and meet policymakers. It also serves as a magnet to attract distinguished scholars and speakers to Florida.

Credits

Contact

Jennifer Snyder, jsnyder@aa.ufl.edu, 352-273-1080

back to the 2009 news index >>

top >>

CLAS Navigation

News, Calendar of Events, Head of the CLAS, Submit News/Event, Media

Search


CLAS Portals

Alumni
Faculty/Staff
Parents
Students

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

2014 Turlington Hall
P.O Box 117300
Gainesville FL 32611
P: 352.392.0780
F: 352.392.3584